MX Linux 16 keeps a good balance between performance and elegance : Review

MX Linux is a Debian stable based GNU/Linux distribution grown as a cooperative venture between the antiX and retired MEPIS communities. It makes use of best tools and technologies from both distributions.

In terms of resource usage, it is expected to be a midweight (somewhere between lightweight and heavy distributions) which combines a beautiful and efficient Xfce desktop with Debian to provide a highly stable, solid operating system. Latest release of distrowatch weekly dated 9th January 2017, features a review of MX Linux 16 as cover story. The review concludes that, the developers of MX Linux were able to keep a fair balance between performance and elegance. The distribution is lightweight, highly responsive with modern technologies.

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Source of this information:
http://www.open-source-feed.com/2017/01/mx-linux-16-keeps-good-balance-between.html

 

 

Developer claims Linux forced Microsoft to up its Windows game support

A few years ago, thanks to Valve and Steam, Linux looked like it was going to become a major game platform. That didn’t happen. But, the threat may have forced Microsoft to improve its Windows game support.

In 2012, Gabe Newell, CEO of the major Steam game platform company Valve, snarled “Windows 8 is a catastrophe for everyone in the PC space.” His solution? Bring Steam to Linux. What drove him to that decision was the gaming bottom line: Performance. Valve’s developers found that an early Linux version runs faster than the Windows version thanks to the “underlying efficiency of the [Linux] kernel and OpenGL“.

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Source of this information:
http://www.zdnet.com/article/developer-claims-linux-forced-microsoft-to-up-its-windows-game-support/

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Happy Holidays: Linux Mint get a major upgrade

The best Linux desktop just got even better.

If you’ve been a good Linux user this year, Santa has a great new present for you in his bag: Linux Mint 18.1 “Serena.” With this long-term support Linux desktop, which is based on Ubuntu 16.04, Linux Mint is better than ever. Since I’ve already found Linux Mint 18 to be the best desktop out there of any sort, that’s saying something.

Why? For starters, at long last you can automatically update Linux Mint. In the past, you had to manually replace Mint while keeping your personal files in a home directory located on another partition. Most other Linux distributions enabled you to avoid this problem. Now, Mint has jumped on the the easy upgrade bandwagon as well.

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Source of this information:
http://www.zdnet.com/article/happy-holidays-linux-mint-get-a-major-upgrade/

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Nextcloud adds security and scalability to its private cloud offering

The latest version of Nextcloud adds business security and scalability improvements to its small business cloud. 

Nextcloud, the ownCloud fork, is continuing to establish itself as a great private cloud. In the past, Nextcloud’s target audience was individuals and small business owners who wanted an Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) cloud to call their own. In its latest update, Nextcloud 11, the company has added significant security and scalability improvements. These will make Nextcloud more attractive to enterprise customers.

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Source of this information:
http://www.zdnet.com/article/nextcloud-adds-security-and-scalability-to-its-private-cloud-offering/

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Serious Ubuntu Linux desktop bugs found and fixed

Remote code execution bugs in Apport, an Ubuntu Linux default file handler, has opened a door to attacks and crashes.

If you, like me, use Ubuntu desktop, or one of its relatives such as Linux Mint, you have a bug to patch. Donncha O’Cearbhaill, an Irish security researcher, found a remote execution bug in Ubuntu. This security hole, which first appeared in Ubuntu 12.10, makes it possible for malicious code to be injected into your system when you open a booby-trapped file. This can be used to crash your system or run malware. It does not — a small blessing — enable attackers to become the root user.

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Source of this information:
http://www.zdnet.com/article/serious-ubuntu-linux-desktop-bugs-found-and-fixed/

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Popular CentOS Linux server gets a major refresh

The new CentOS 7 release, based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.3, has arrived.

CentOS doesn’t get many headlines. But it’s still the server Linux of choice for many hosting companies, datacenters, and businesses with in-house Linux experts. That’s because CentOS, which is controlled by Red Hat, is aRed Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) clone. As such, it reaps the benefits of RHEL’s business Linux development efforts without RHEL’s costs.

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Source of this information:
http://www.zdnet.com/article/popular-centos-linux-server-gets-a-major-refresh/

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Nextcloud adds security and scalability to its private cloud offering

The latest version of Nextcloud adds business security and scalability improvements to its small business cloud. 

Nextcloud, the ownCloud fork, is continuing to establish itself as a great private cloud. In the past, Nextcloud’s target audience was individuals and small business owners who wanted an Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) cloud to call their own. In its latest update, Nextcloud 11, the company has added significant security and scalability improvements. These will make Nextcloud more attractive to enterprise customers.

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Source of this information:
http://www.zdnet.com/article/nextcloud-adds-security-and-scalability-to-its-private-cloud-offering/

Author: 

Linux 4.9 Roars as Largest Linux Release Ever

On December 11, Linus Torvalds officially announced the release of the Linux 4.9 kernel, codenamed ‘Roaring Lionus’, marking the debut of the sixth and final Linux kernel release of 2016.The new release follow the Linux 4.8 milestone that debuted on October 2

According to Torvalds, the Linux 4.9 kernel release is noteworthy for a number of reasons. “I’m pretty sure this is the biggest release we’ve ever had, at least in number of commits,” Torvalds wrote in in his announcement message for the new kernel. “If you look at the number of lines changed, we’ve had bigger releases in the past, but they have tended to be due to specific issues (v4.2 got a lot of lines from the AMD GPU register definition files, for example, and we’ve had big re-organizations that caused a lot of lines in the past: v3.2 was big due to staging, v3.7 had the automated uapi header file disintegration, etc).”

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Source of this information:
http://www.linuxplanet.com/news/linux-4.9-roars-as-largest-linux-release-ever.html

Author: Sean Michael Kerner

Korora 25 Linux Released, Based on Fedora 25 Ships with Cinnamon 3.2, MATE 1.16

On December 7, 2016, the development team behind the Fedora-based Korora Linux operating system proudly announced the release and general availability of Korora 25.

Dubbed Gurgle and based on the recently released Fedora 25 Linux distribution, Korora 25 arrives today approximately five months after the release of Korora 24 “Sheldon” and ships with up-to-date GNU/Linux technologies and Open Source software projects, including the Linux 4.8 kernel.

Due to popular demand, it looks like Korora 25 ships with a KDE edition, which is built around the KDE Plasma 5 desktop environment and designed to offer users an out-of-the-box, vanilla look and feel, but includes the usual Korora extras. Korora 25 also features GNOME 3.22, Xfce 4.12, Cinnamon 3.2, and MATE 1.16 editions.

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Source of this information:
http://news.softpedia.com/news/korora-25-linux-released-based-on-fedora-25-ships-with-cinnamon-3-2-mate-1-16-510807.shtml

Author: Marius Nestor

Embedded Linux at sweet 16: adapting to the IoT

At ELC Europe, embedded Linux guru Tim Bird examined the “Status of Embedded Linux” and discussed challenges that it faces in the brave new world of IoT.

As Chair of the Architecture Group of The Linux Foundation’s CE Working Group, Tim Bird has long been the amiable public face of the Embedded Linux Conferences, which he has run for over a decade. At the recent ELC Europe event in Berlin, Bird gave a “Status of Embedded Linux” keynote in which he discussed the good news in areas like GPU support and virtually mapped kernel stacks, as well as the slow progress in boot time, system size, and other areas that might help Linux compete with RTOSes in IoT leaf nodes.

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Source of this information:
http://hackerboards.com/embedded-linux-at-sweet-16-adapting-to-the-iot/

Author: Eric Brown