Open source projects for the Internet of Things, from A to Z

This guide to 21 open source projects for IoT ranges from standards organizations to open source frameworks and dev tools.

The Internet of Things market is fragmented, amorphous, and continually changing, and its very nature requires more than the usual attention to interoperability. It’s not surprising then, that open source has done quite well here — customers are hesitant to bet their IoT future on a proprietary platform that may fade or become difficult to customize and interconnect.

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Source of this information:
http://hackerboards.com/open-source-projects-for-the-internet-of-things-from-a-to-z/

Author: Eric Brown

Abigail Cabunoc Mayes: How to Bring Open Source to a Closed Community

One of the things we took away from this talk is that open source can be fun — and that’s a good thing. 

Abigail Cabunoc Mayes, who works for the Mozilla Foundation as the lead developer for open source engagement, recently gave a lively talk explaining open source inclusion practices. View this engaging video here (on the website).

You’ll learn lots of useful tips, as well as being introduced to a wide array of people working on open source projects. I’m following twenty new people on Twitter as a result of watching this talk — and my head is now spinning — in a very positive way. Love those folks in Detroit working on open source social justice projects.

Author: Phil Shapiro

Oracle pledges continued support for Java and NetBeans

Java experts have questioned Oracle’s support for Java, but Oracle swears it’s fully behind Java Enterprise Edition and NetBeans.

Last week, Oracle disowned NetBeans. The company announced it was turning its Java-based NetBeans over to the Apache Software Foundation. Now, Oracle is changing its tune on both NetBeans and Java Enterprise Edition (JEE). Oh, don’t get me wrong. Oracle still doesn’t want to manage NetBeans. But Oracle claims it’s not just dumping the NetBeans integrated developer environment (IDE) code.

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Source of this information:
http://www.zdnet.com/article/oracle-pledges-continued-support-for-java-and-netbeans/

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Linux Kernel 4.8 Could Land October 2 as Linus Torvalds Announces the Seventh RC

Linus Torvalds just made his regular Sunday announcement to inform the community about the availability of the seventh and last Release Candidate (RC) development build of the forthcoming Linux 4.8 kernel series.

According to Linus Torvalds, Linux kernel 4.8 Release Candidate 7 is once again bigger in patches than he was expected. Last week, we reported that things are calming down and that this series will be a normal one with seven RCs, but it now looks like it won’t happen, and there should be one more RC released next week, September 25, 2016.

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Source of this information:
http://news.softpedia.com/news/linux-kernel-4-8-could-land-october-2-as-linus-torvalds-announces-the-seventh-rc-508428.shtml#ixzz4KhYDNEHb

Author: Marius Nestor

Classic Unix/Linux editor Vim gets first update in years

After more than a decade, the vi, or Vim, editor is getting a major update.

In 1976, Bill Joy, co-founder of Sun Microsystems and BSD Unix hacker, needed a text editor that would work over a 300 baud modem connection. Emacs wouldn’t do. As Joy has said, “The people doing Emacs were sitting in labs at MIT with what were essentially fibre-channel links to the host, in contemporary terms.” So, he created vi, and thus began the longest tech flame war in history.

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Source of this information:
http://www.zdnet.com/article/vim-update-classic-unix-linux-editor-gets-first-update-in-years/

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​Linus Torvalds reveals his favorite programming laptop

It’s the Dell XPS 13 Developer Editon, here’s why.

I recently talked with some Linux developers about what the best laptop is for serious programmers. As a result I checked out several laptops from a programmer’s viewpoint. The winner in my book? The 2016 Dell XPS 13 Developer Edition. I’m in good company. Linus Torvalds, Linux’s creator, agrees. The Dell XPS 13 Developer Edition, for him, is the best laptop around.

Torvald’s requirements may not be yours though. On Google+, Torvald explained, “First off: I don’t use my laptop as a desktop replacement, and I only travel for a small handful of events each year. So for me, the laptop is a fairly specialized thing that doesn’t get daily (or even weekly) use, so the main criteria are not some kind of “average daily use”, but very much “travel use”.

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Source of this information:
http://www.zdnet.com/article/linus-torvalds-reveals-his-favorite-programming-laptop/

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Sweet SUSE! HPE snags itself a Linux distro

No one noticed, but in HPE’s spin-off of its software assets, the company also tied the knot with leading enterprise Linux power SUSE.

Before HPE spun out its software assets in a deal with Micro Focus, the UK-based business was best known for its soup-to-nuts support of COBOL. What most people missed is the deal also made HPE the first major, old-school technology company to give preference to Linux distributor SUSEMicro Focus obtained SUSE Linux as part of its Attachmate deal in 2014. Prior to that, Attachmate acquired SUSE and its then-parent company Novell in 2011.

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Source of this information:
http://www.zdnet.com/article/sweet-suse-hpe-snags-itself-a-linux-distro/

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​OpenOffice is dead. Long live LibreOffice

Yes, OpenOffice is dying. So what? Its successor, LibreOffice, is doing better than ever.

If you read some stories about how OpenOffice is reaching the end of the road, you might think OpenOffice was becoming insecure. That’s half true. OpenOffice doesn’t have the programmers it needs to be safe. That’s because all its good developers moved to its fork, LibreOffice, years ago. LibreOffice is as safe as any program can be.

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Source of this information:
http://www.zdnet.com/article/openoffice-is-dead-long-live-libreoffice/

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How Apple could make its next social experiment a successful one

Apple has a terrible track record when it comes to creating its own social platforms, but focusing on sharing straight from the iPhone could break the cycle.

Let’s just say it: Apple’s history with building social networks is terrible. It tried with Ping (and again with Apple Music Connect) and the conventional wisdom is that the company just doesn’t get it when it comes to building social networks. Which is funny, because it’s been great at building new platforms for other people to build social networks.

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Source of this information:
http://www.macworld.com/article/3114730/ios/how-apple-could-make-its-next-social-experiment-a-successful-one.html#tk.rss_all

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Starting with Linux in the early days

Linus Torvalds created Linux, but many others, both developers and executives, helped make it the world’s most successful operating system. Here’s how they became involved with Linux.

In 1991, I was already an experienced Unix sysadmin and writer. I’m sure I saw Linus Torvalds’s famous Usenet message: “I’m doing a (free) operating system (just a hobby, won’t be big and professional like gnu) for 386(486) AT clones,” and I paid it no mind. Many people said similar things and little came of it. This time, it would be different.

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Source of this information:
http://www.zdnet.com/article/starting-with-linux-in-the-early-days/

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